Marburg virus

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Lake Victoria Marburgvirus

Marburg virus or simply Marburg is the common name for the genus of viruses Marburgvirus, which contains one species, Lake Victoria marburgvirus. The virus causes the disease Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever (MHF), also referred to as Marburg Virus Disease, and previously also known as green monkey disease due to its primate origin. Marburg originated in Central and East Africa, and infects both human and nonhuman primates. The Marburg Virus is in the same taxonomic family as Ebola, and both are identical structurally although they elicit different antibodies.

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Etymology

The genera Marburgvirus and Ebolavirus were originally classified as the species of the now nonexistent Filovirus genus. In March 1998, the Vertebrate Virus Subcommittee proposed to the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) to change the Filovirus genus to Filovirus family with two specific genera: Ebola-like viruses and Marburg-like viruses. This proposal was implemented in Washington DC as of April 2001 and in Paris as of July 2002. In 2000, another proposal was made in Washington DC to change the "-like viruses" to "-virus" (e.g. Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus) in addition to renaming the only species in the Marburgvirus genus from Marburg virus to Lake Victoria Marburgvirus.[1]

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