Masonic Lodge

related topics
{law, state, case}
{group, member, jewish}
{government, party, election}
{work, book, publish}
{theory, work, human}
{language, word, form}
{church, century, christian}

This article is about the Masonic term for a membership group. For buildings named Masonic Lodge, see Masonic Lodge (disambiguation)

Freemasonry · Grand Lodge · Masonic Lodge · Masonic Lodge Officers · Grand Master · Prince Hall Freemasonry · Regular Masonic jurisdictions

History of Freemasonry · Liberté chérie · Masonic manuscripts

A Masonic Lodge, often termed a Private Lodge or Constituent Lodge in Books of Constitutions, is the basic organisation of Freemasonry. Every new Lodge must be warranted or chartered by a Grand Lodge, but is subject to its direction only in enforcing the published Constitution of the jurisdiction. By exception the three surviving lodges that formed the world's first known Grand Lodge in London (today called the United Grand Lodge of England) have the unique privilege to operate as time immemorial i.e. without such warrant; only one other lodge operates without a warrant - this is the Grand Stewards' Lodge in London, although it is not also entitled to the "time immemorial" title.[1] A Freemason is generally entitled to visit any Lodge, in any jurisdiction (i.e. under any Grand Lodge) in amity with his own. In some jurisdictions this privilege is restricted to Master Masons (that is, Freemasons who have attained the Order's third degree). He is first usually required to check, and certify, the regularity of the relationship of the Lodge - and be able to satisfy that Lodge of his regularity of membership. Freemasons gather together as a Lodge to work the three basic Degrees of Entered Apprentice, Fellowcraft and Master Mason.

Contents

Types

Freemasons meet as a Lodge not in a Lodge, although Masonic premises may be called Lodges, as well as Temples ("of Philosophy and the Arts"). In many countries Masonic Centre or Hall has now replaced these terms to avoid arousing prejudice and suspicion. Several different Lodges, or other Masonic organisations, often use the same premises at different times.

Blue Lodges, Craft Lodges or Ancient Craft Lodges refer to the lodges that work the first three Masonic degrees, rather than the appendant Masonic orders such as York Rite and Scottish Rite. The term "Craft Lodge" is used in Great Britain. The Blue Lodge is said to refer to the traditional colour of regalia in Lodges derived from English or Irish Freemasonry. Although the term was originally frowned upon, it has gained widespread and mainstream usage in America in recent times.[2]

Full article ▸

related documents
Affray
Jury instructions
Chisholm v. Georgia
Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide
Judicial discretion
United States Solicitor General
Fourth Geneva Convention
Pacta sunt servanda
Execution warrant
Bill of rights
Ex parte Milligan
Abstract (law)
Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves
English Heritage
Fighting words
Arraignment
Universal Copyright Convention
Permanent Court of Arbitration
Civilian
Cross-examination
Marihuana Tax Act of 1937
Preamble
Judiciary
IANAL
Operation TIPS
Time constraint
Ripeness
International human rights instruments
Rebuttal
Clean Air Act (1970)