Match

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{acid, form, water}
{game, team, player}
{ship, engine, design}
{food, make, wine}
{son, year, death}
{company, market, business}
{law, state, case}
{service, military, aircraft}
{day, year, event}
{work, book, publish}
{country, population, people}
{black, white, people}
{church, century, christian}
{city, population, household}

A match is a combustible tool for lighting a fire in controlled circumstances. They are commonly sold by tobacconists and many other kinds of shops. Matches are usually sold in quantity, packaged in match boxes or matchbooks. A match is typically a wooden stick (typical in the case of match boxes) or stiff paper stick (in the case of matchbooks) coated at one end with a material which will ignite from the heat of friction if struck against a suitable surface.[1] The lighting end of a match is known as the match "head" and, depending on type, either contains phosphorus or phosphorus sesquisulfide as the active ingredient and gelatin as a binder. There are two main types of matches: safety matches, which can be struck only against a specially prepared surface; and strike-anywhere matches, for which any suitably frictional surface can be used.

Match-type compositions may also be used to produce electric matches, which are fired electrically. These items do not rely on the heat of friction.

Contents

Etymology

Historically, the term match referred to lengths of cord (later, cambric) impregnated with chemicals, and allowed to burn continuously.[1] These were used to light fires and fire guns (see Matchlock) and cannons (see Linstock). Such matches were characterised by their burning speed i.e. quick match and slow match. Depending on formulation, slow match burns at a rate of around 30 cm (1 ft) per hour and quick match at 4 to 60 centimetres (1.6 to 24 in) per minute.

Full article ▸

related documents
Bakelite
Erlenmeyer flask
Chert
Arc lamp
Wax
Jasper
Soapstone
Unobtainium
Personal protective equipment
Powerlifting
Fiber
Resin identification code
Preform
Power tool
Crokinole
Puzzle
Gouache
Knapping
Lace
Blackwork Embroidery
Converse (shoe company)
Natural Color System
Honeycomb
Canvas work
Applique
Crayola
Bifocals
Teddy bear
Protection (climbing)
Prismatic blade