Maurice Merleau-Ponty

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{son, year, death}
{work, book, publish}
{language, word, form}
{game, team, player}
{woman, child, man}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{church, century, christian}
{disease, patient, cell}
{math, number, function}
{god, call, give}

Maurice Merleau-Ponty (French pronunciation: [mɔʁis mɛʁlopɔ̃ti]) (March 14, 1908 – May 3, 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Karl Marx,[1] Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger in addition to being closely associated with Jean-Paul Sartre (who later stated he had been "converted" to Marxism by Merleau-Ponty[2]) and Simone de Beauvoir. At the core of Merleau-Ponty's philosophy is a sustained argument for the foundational role that perception plays in understanding the world as well as engaging with the world. Like the other major phenomenologists Merleau-Ponty expressed his philosophical insights in writings on art, literature, linguistics, and politics; Merleau-Ponty was the only major phenomenologist of the first half of the twentieth century, however, to engage extensively with the sciences, and especially with descriptive psychology. Because of this engagement his writings have become influential with the recent project of naturalizing phenomenology in which phenomenologists use the results of psychology and cognitive science.

Contents

Life

Merleau-Ponty was born in 1908 in Rochefort-sur-Mer, Charente-Maritime, France. His father died in 1913 when Merleau-Ponty was 5.[3] After secondary schooling at the lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, Maurice Merleau-Ponty became a student at the École Normale Supérieure, where he studied alongside Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir and Simone Weil. He passed the agrégation in philosophy in 1930.

Full article ▸

related documents
Reality
Unconscious mind
Self-esteem
Structuralism
Theory
Theodor W. Adorno
Emotion
Critical theory
Fundamentalism
Paul Feyerabend
History of logic
Consequentialism
Transactional analysis
Falsifiability
Alfred Adler
Gilles Deleuze
Reason
Arthur Schopenhauer
Unification Thought
Noam Chomsky
Epicureanism
Gottfried Leibniz
Nihilism
Science
Functionalism (sociology)
Ideology
John Dewey
Max Weber
Mind
Religion