Mendelian inheritance

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Chromosome
DNA · RNA
Genome
Heredity
Mutation
Nucleotide
Variation

Glossary
Index
Outline

Introduction
History

Evolution · Molecular
Population genetics
Mendelian inheritance
Quantitative genetics
Molecular genetics

DNA sequencing
Genetic engineering
Genomics · Topics
Medical genetics

Branches in genetics

Mendelian inheritance (or Mendelian genetics or Mendelism) is a set of primary tenets relating to the transmission of hereditary characteristics from parent organisms to their offspring; it underlies much of genetics. They were initially derived from the work of Gregor Mendel published in 1865 and 1866 which was "re-discovered" in 1900, and were initially very controversial. When they were integrated with the chromosome theory of inheritance by Thomas Hunt Morgan in 1915, they became the core of classical genetics.

Contents

History

The laws of inheritance were derived by Gregor Mendel, a 19th century Austrian Priest/monk conducting hybridization experiments in garden peas (Pisum sativum).[1] Between 1856 and 1863, he cultivated and tested some 29,000 pea plants. From these experiments he deduced two generalizations which later became known as Mendel's Principles of Heredity or Mendelian inheritance. He described these principles in a two part paper, Experiments on Plant Hybridization that he read to the Natural History Society of Brno on February 8 and March 8, 1865, and which was published in 1866.[2]

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