Mescaline

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{@card@, make, design}
{food, make, wine}
{law, state, case}
{theory, work, human}
{day, year, event}
{group, member, jewish}
{acid, form, water}
{film, series, show}
{school, student, university}

Mescaline or 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenethylamine is a naturally-occurring psychedelic alkaloid of the phenethylamine class used mainly as an entheogen.

It occurs naturally in the peyote cactus (Lophophora williamsii),[1] the San Pedro cactus (Echinopsis pachanoi) and the Peruvian Torch cactus (Echinopsis peruviana), and in a number of other members of the Cactaceae plant family. It is also found in small amounts in certain members of the Fabaceae (bean) family, including Acacia berlandieri.[2] Mescaline was first isolated and identified in 1897 by the German Arthur Heffter and first synthesized in 1919 by Ernst Späth.

Contents

History and usage

Peyote has been used for over 3000 years by Native Americans in Mexico.[1] Europeans noted use of peyote in Native American religious ceremonies upon early contact, notably by the Huichols in Mexico. Other mescaline-containing cacti such as the San Pedro have a long history of use in South America, from Peru to Ecuador.

In traditional peyote preparations the top of the cactus is cut at ground level, leaving the large tap roots to grow new 'Heads'. These 'Heads' are then dried to make disk-shaped buttons. Buttons are chewed to produce the effects or soaked in water for an intoxicating drink. However, the taste of the cactus is bitter, so users will often grind it into a powder and pour it in capsules to avoid having to taste it. The usual human dosage is 200–400 milligrams of mescaline sulfate or 178–356 milligrams of mescaline hydrochloride.[3] The average 3 inch button contains about 25 mg mescaline.[4]

Aldous Huxley described his experience with mescaline in The Doors of Perception. Aleister Crowley reported using mescaline in his diary. The sex psychologist Havelock Ellis also tried mescaline.[5] Hunter S. Thompson recounted his use of mescaline in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.

Full article ▸

related documents
Tendon
Impetigo
Peritonitis
Shigellosis
Darbepoetin alfa
Syringe
Febrile seizure
Lemierre's syndrome
Bacterial vaginosis
Lithotriptor
Duodenum
Stevens-Johnson syndrome
Disease
Placenta
Anosmia
Cyclothymia
Amoxicillin
Bioterrorism
Peyronie's disease
Lymphoma
Sports injury
Hygiene
Monoamine oxidase
Infection
Capillary
Joubert syndrome
Heart disease
Bronchodilator
Spleen
Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome