Millipede

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{@card@, make, design}
{acid, form, water}
{system, computer, user}

See text

Millipedes are arthropods that have two pairs of legs per segment (except for the first segment behind the head which does not have any appendages at all, and the next few which only have one pair of legs). Each segment that has two pairs of legs is a result of two single segments fused together as one. Most millipedes have very elongated cylindrical bodies, although some are flattened dorso-ventrally, while pill millipedes are shorter and can roll into a ball, like a pillbug.

The name "millipede" is a compound word formed from the Latin roots mille ("thousand") and pes ("foot"). Despite their name, millipedes do not have 1,000 legs, although the rare species Illacme plenipes has up to 750.[2] Common species have between 36 and 400 legs. The class contains around 10,000 species in 13 orders and 115 families. The giant African millipede (Archispirostreptus gigas), known as shongololos, is the largest species of millipede.

Millipedes are detritivores and slow moving. Most millipedes eat decaying leaves and other dead plant matter, moisturising the food with secretions and then scraping it in with its jaws. However, they can also be a minor garden pest, especially in greenhouses where they can cause severe damage to emergent seedlings. Signs of millipede damage include the stripping of the outer layers of a young plant stem and irregular damage to leaves and plant apices.

Millipedes can be easily distinguished from the somewhat similar and related centipedes (Class Chilopoda), which move rapidly, and have a single pair of legs for each body segment.

Contents

Evolution

This class of arthropod is thought to be among the first animals to have colonised land during the Silurian geologic period. These early forms probably ate mosses and primitive vascular plants. The oldest known land creature, Pneumodesmus newmani, was a 1 centimetre (0.39 in) long millipede, and lived 428 million years ago.[3] In the Upper Carboniferous (340 to 280 million years ago), Arthropleura became the largest known land invertebrate of all time, reaching lengths of up to 2.6 metres (8 ft 6 in).

Full article ▸

related documents
American Goldfinch
Fennec Fox
Spore
Fig wasp
Slime mold
Graptolite
Phoronid
Euphorbia
Red Wolf
Dragonfly
Evergreen bagworm
Gibbon
Green Iguana
Differences between butterflies and moths
Mycorrhiza
Narwhal
Genome
Burying beetle
Monocotyledon
Fox
Wombat
Pterodactylus
Chupacabra
Porpoise
Phylogenetics
Quagga
Elm
Ovum
Mustelidae
Brachiopod