Moa

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Anomalopteryx bush moa or lesser moa
Euryapteryx stout-legged moa or coastal moa
Megalapteryx upland moa
Dinornis giant moa
Emeus eastern moa
Pachyornis Mappin’s moa, heavy-footed moa, or crested moa

Dinornithes

The moa[3][4] were eleven species (in six genera)[5] of flightless birds endemic to New Zealand. The two largest species, Dinornis robustus and Dinornis novaezelandiae, reached about 3.7 m (12 ft) in height with neck outstretched, and weighed about 230 kg (510 lb).[6]

Moa are members of the order Struthioniformes (or ratites) although some sources also recognise these as the separate order Dinornithiformes.[5] The eleven[5] species of moa are the only wingless birds, lacking even the vestigial wings which all other ratites have. They were the dominant herbivores in New Zealand forest, shrubland and subalpine ecosystems for thousands of years, and until the arrival of the Māori were hunted only by the Haast's Eagle. It is generally considered that most, if not all, species of Moa died out by Maori hunting and habitat decline before European discovery and settlement.

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