Molecular electronics

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Part of a series of articles on

Nanoelectronics

Molecular electronics
Molecular logic gate
Molecular wires

Nanocircuitry
Nanowires
Nanolithography
NEMS
Nanosensor

Nanoionics
Nanophotonics
Nanomechanics

See also
Nanotechnology
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Molecular electronics (sometimes called moletronics) involves the study and application of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. This includes both passive and active electronic components. Molecular electronics is a branch of nanotechology.

An interdisciplinary pursuit, molecular electronics spans physics, chemistry, and materials science. The unifying feature is the use of molecular building blocks for the fabrication of electronic components. This includes both passive (e.g. resistive wires) and active components such as transistors and molecular-scale switches. Due to the prospect of size reduction in electronics offered by molecular-level control of properties, molecular electronics has aroused much excitement both in science fiction and among scientists. Molecular electronics provides means to extend Moore's Law beyond the foreseen limits of small-scale conventional silicon integrated circuits.

Molecular electronics is split into two related but separate subdisciplines: molecular materials for electronics utilizes the properties of the molecules to affect the bulk properties of a material, while molecular scale electronics focuses on single-molecule applications.[1][2]

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