Monday

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Monday (pronounced /ˈmʌndeɪ, ˈmʌndi/ ( listen)) is the day of the week between Sunday and Tuesday. According to international standard ISO 8601 it is the first day of the work week. According to the Islamic and Hebrew calendars, Sunday is the first day of the week. The name of Monday is derived from Old English Mōnandæg and Middle English Monenday, which means "moon day".

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Etymology

The English noun Monday derived sometime before 1200 from monedæi, which itself developed from Old English (around 1000) mōnandæg and mōndæg (literally meaning "moon's day"), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian mōnadeig, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch mānendach (modern Dutch Maandag), Old High German mānetag (modern German Montag), and Old Norse mánadagr (Swedish and Norwegian nynorsk måndag, Icelandic mánudagur. Danish and Norwegian bokmål mandag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin lunae dies ("day of the moon").[1]

In many Slavic languages the name of the day eschews pagan tradition and translates as "after Sunday/holiday" (Russian понедельник (poniediélnik), Bulgarian понеделник (ponedelnik), Polish poniedzialek, Czech "pondělí". In Turkish it is called "pazartesi", which means the day after Sunday. In most Indic languages, the word for Monday is derived from Sanskrit Sōmavāra.[2] Japanese and Korean share the same ancient Chinese words '月曜日' (Hiragana:げつようび, Hangul:월요일) for Monday which means day of the moon.

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