Moniaive

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Moniaive is a village in the south of Scotland in Dumfries and Galloway, near Thornhill, on the A702 road and B729 road. Population 520 (2004). The name is from Gaelic monadh-abh and means "Hill of Streams". It is situated at the northern end of the very scenic and tranquil Cairn Valley. It is within the parish of Glencairn and a bi-monthly newspaper, called the Glencairn Gazette and free for local residents, is produced by volunteers .

Contents

History

Covenanters

In the 17th century, Moniaive became the refuge for the Covenanters, a group of Presbyterian nonconformists who rebelled at having the Episcopalian religion forced on them by the last three Stuart kings, Charles I, Charles II and James II of England (James VII of Scotland). There is a monument off the Ayr Road to James Renwick, a Covenanter leader born in Moniaive and later executed in Edinburgh.

The community

The village was planned and built by a local landowner in the 17th century and consists of two parts separated by the Dalwhat Burn, Dunreggan and Moniaive village itself. With a shop, post office, garage,an organic cafe, several arts and crafts studios, beauty salon, primary school and two hotels with bars and restaurants, it is a thriving community with a strong community spirit. Every year a number of festivals are held within the parish; Moniaive Horse Show, Gala Day, Arts Association exhibition, Beer and Food festival, Comedy nights, Moniaive Folk Festival, Horticultural show to name but a few. In 2004 The Times described the village as one of the 'coolest' in Britain.

James Paterson

The Scottish artist James Paterson lived here and painted many local scenes including "The Last Turning". Until 2005 there was a Paterson museum within the village but this has now closed and Paterson's photographs and memorabilia are now lodged at Glasgow University's Crichton campus in Dumfries.

Transport

The Cairn Valley Light Railway was opened from Dumfries in 1905 but closed to passengers during World War II and never reopened. The village is connected to Dumfries and Thornhill by local bus services. There is also a community bus run by volunteers for trips, with a scheduled service to Castle Douglas.

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