Movimiento Libertario

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The Partido Movimiento Libertario ("Libertarian Movement Party or PML") is a political party based on liberalism in Costa Rica.

It was founded in May 1994 and, since then, has enjoyed a number of victories. It succeeded in getting attorney Otto Guevara elected to the Legislative Assembly in its first campaign in 1998. In 2002, Guevara ran for president (unsuccessfully, 1.7% of the vote), and the party at the legislative elections won 9.3% of the popular vote and 6 out of 57 seats. A few weeks after taking office, one Congressman left the party and became independent, leaving PML with five seats. In 2006, Guevara again ran for president (unsuccessfully, 8.4% of the vote), and the party at the legislative elections won 9.1% of the popular vote and 6 out of 57 seats. A few months later, another Congressman left the party and became independent, leaving PML with five seats again.[citation needed] In the 2010 general election Guevara was again the PML's presidential candidate and received 20% of the popular vote.

The PML was an observer of the Liberal International or LI, and recently attained full status according to the LI website; so therefore it is also listed as a liberal party.

Contents

Purpose

The party claims to represent hundreds of thousands of Costa Rican citizens from all walks of life, tired of politics, parties, traditional politicians, and the country's deteriorating situation.

Policy positions

[citation needed]

  • Moderate intervention of the State in health, education, infrastructure and other areas
  • Break up of all of the state-owned monopolies and eliminate legal barriers on private economic activities
  • Provide a low flat tax for the income produced within the country, eliminate many of the current taxes
  • Free trade -- eliminate tariffs and barriers to the entry of goods
  • Freedom to choose the currency that consenting individuals want
  • Freedom to choose your own doctor within the social security system
  • Strengthen individual pension accounts
  • Freedom of parents to choose schools through vouchers
  • Respect for private property
  • Reduction of the participation of government in the economy
  • Freedom of speech and press
  • Respect for the religious beliefs (or lack thereof) of the people
  • Transfer of responsibility from central government to local governments
  • Preventing gays or bisexuals from adopting children, even when in a heterosexual marriage.[1][2]

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