Mushroom

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{food, make, wine}
{disease, patient, cell}
{@card@, make, design}
{acid, form, water}
{language, word, form}
{theory, work, human}
{film, series, show}
{god, call, give}
{day, year, event}

A mushroom is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground on soil or on its food source. Mushrooms are not plants: they are a fungus. They eat organic matter, and do not photosynthesize like plants do. The standard for the name "mushroom" is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus, hence the word mushroom is most often applied to those fungi (Basidiomycota, Agaricomycetes) that have a stem (stipe), a cap (pileus), and gills (lamellae, sing. lamella) on the underside of the cap.

"Mushroom" describes a variety of gilled fungi, with or without stems, and the term is used even more generally, to describe both the fleshy fruiting bodies of some Ascomycota and the woody or leathery fruiting bodies of some Basidiomycota, depending upon the context of the word.

Forms deviating from the standard morphology usually have more specific names, such as "puffball", "stinkhorn", and "morel", and gilled mushrooms themselves are often called "agarics" in reference to their similarity to Agaricus or their place Agaricales. By extension, the term "mushroom" can also designate the entire fungus when in culture or the thallus (called a mycelium) of species forming the fruiting bodies called mushrooms, or the species itself.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Piper (genus)
Acacia
Transgenic maize
Pawpaw
Neem
Comfrey
Castor oil plant
Lobster
Companion planting
Osage-orange
Slaughterhouse
Aconitum
Herring
Melaleuca
Pine
Iris (plant)
Narcissus (genus)
Pollen
Salvia
Sundew
Amaranth
Heinrich Anton de Bary
Great Dane
Ulmus americana
British Shorthair
Magnoliaceae
Possum
Strepsiptera
Diprotodontia
Spiny lobster