Neuro-linguistic programming

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NLP

History
NLP and science
Methods
Positive/Negative

Meta model
Milton model
Anchoring
Metaphor
Reframing
Rep. systems
Submodalities
Perceptual positions
Meta-programs

Therapy

Richard Bandler
John Grinder
Robert Dilts
Judith DeLozier
Stephen Gilligan

Fritz Perls
Milton H. Erickson
Virginia Satir
Syntax
Gregory Bateson
Alfred Korzybski

Topics
Bibliography
Studies

Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) is a controversial [1] approach to psychotherapy and organizational change based on "a model of interpersonal communication chiefly concerned with the relationship between successful patterns of behaviour and the subjective experiences (esp. patterns of thought) underlying them" and "a system of alternative therapy based on this which seeks to educate people in self-awareness and effective communication, and to change their patterns of mental and emotional behaviour".[2]

The co-founders, Richard Bandler and linguist John Grinder, claimed that NLP would be instrumental in "finding ways to help people have better, fuller and richer lives".[3] They coined the term "Neuro-Linguistic Programming" to denote their belief in a connection between neurological processes ("neuro"), language ("linguistic") and behavioral patterns that have been learned through experience ("programming") and can be organized to achieve specific goals in life.[4][5][6]

Neuro-linguistic programming was originally promoted by its co-founders in the 1970s as an effective and rapid form of psychological therapy,[7][8][9] capable of addressing the full range of problems that psychologists are likely to encounter, such as phobias, depression, habit disorder, psychosomatic illnesses, and learning disorders.[10] It also espoused the potential for self-determination through overcoming learned limitations[11] and emphasized well-being and healthy functioning. Later, it was promoted as a "science of excellence", derived from the study or "modeling"[12] of how successful or outstanding people in different fields obtain their results. It was claimed that these skills can be learned by anyone to improve one's effectiveness both personally and professionally[13]

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