Noise (music)

related topics
{album, band, music}
{theory, work, human}
{system, computer, user}
{black, white, people}
{math, energy, light}

Noise music is a term used to describe varieties of avant-garde music and sound art that may use elements such as cacophony, dissonance, atonality, noise, indeterminacy, and repetition in their realization. Noise music can feature distortion, various types of acoustically or electronically generated noise, randomly produced electronic signals, and non-traditional musical instruments. Noise music may also incorporate manipulated recordings, static, hiss and hum, feedback, live machine sounds, custom noise software, circuit bent instruments, and non-musical vocal elements that push noise towards the ecstatic.[1][2][3]

The Futurist art movement was important for the development of the noise aesthetic, as was the Dada art movement (a prime example being the Antisymphony concert performed on April 30, 1919 in Berlin),[4][5] and later the Surrealist and Fluxus art movements, specifically the Fluxus artists Joe Jones, Yasunao Tone, George Brecht, Robert Watts, Wolf Vostell, Yoko Ono, Walter De Maria's Ocean Music, Milan Knížák's Broken Music Composition, early LaMonte Young and Takehisa Kosugi.[6]

Contemporary noise music is often associated with extreme volume and distortion, particularly in the popular music domain with examples such as Jimi Hendrix's use of feedback, Nine Inch Nails, Sonic Youth and Lou Reed's Metal Machine Music.[7]

Other examples of music that contain noise-based features include works by Iannis Xenakis, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Helmut Lachenmann, Cornelius Cardew, Theatre of Eternal Music, Rhys Chatham, Ryoji Ikeda, Survival Research Laboratories, Whitehouse, Cabaret Voltaire, Psychic TV, Blackhouse, Jean Tinguely's recordings of his sound sculpture (specifically Bascule VII), the music of Hermann Nitsch's Orgien Mysterien Theater, and La Monte Young's bowed gong works from the late 1960s.[8] Genres such as industrial, industrial techno, and glitch music employ noise-based materials.[9][10][11]

Full article ▸

related documents
Free jazz
Anarcho-punk
Art rock
Claude Debussy
Gustav Mahler
Mellotron
Coldplay
Pentatonic scale
Les Paul
American march music
Primal Scream
Synthpop
Count Basie
Robert Smith (musician)
Physical Graffiti
San Francisco Symphony
Geddy Lee
Funkadelic
Rubber Soul
Richie Sambora
Pulp (band)
New York Philharmonic
Heartbreak Hotel
Bebop
Brian Wilson
Mike Watt
Huey Lewis and the News
Pierre Boulez
Rancid (band)
Tejano music