Norse dwarves

related topics
{god, call, give}
{@card@, make, design}
{black, white, people}
{son, year, death}
{theory, work, human}
{language, word, form}
{specie, animal, plant}
{area, part, region}

Dvergar or Norse dwarves (Old Norse dvergar, sing. dvergr) are entities in Norse mythology associated with rocks, the earth, deathliness, luck, technology, craft, metal work, wisdom, and greed. They are sometimes identified with Svartálfar ('black elves'), and Døkkálfar ('dark elves'),[1] due to their apparently interchangeable use in early texts such as the Eddas.

While the word "Dvergar" is related etymologically to "dwarves", the early Norse concept of Dvergar is unlike the concept of "dwarves" in other cultures. For instance, Norse dwarves may originally have been envisaged as being of human size.[2] They are not described as small before the 13th century, when the later legendary sagas portrayed them as such, often as a humorous element.[citation needed]

In later Scandinavian folklore, other kinds of nature spirits (Vættir), like the Troll and the Nisse, seem[neutrality is disputed] to take over many of the functions of the Dvergar.[citation needed]

In the Dvergatal section, the Völuspá divides the dwarves into what may be three tribes, lead firstly by Mótsognir their first ruler, secondly by Durinn, and finally by Dvalinn. Hávamál mentions Dvalinn brought the rune writing to the Dvergar.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Gospel of Barnabas
Achilles
Guan Yin
Divine Comedy
Krishna
Druid
Illithid
Hera
Afterlife
Osiris
Shiva
Parvati
Manichaeism
Book of Genesis
Moloch
Werewolf
Jainism
Latvian mythology
Mahābhārata
Virgin birth of Jesus
Tower of Babel
Gospel of Matthew
Mithraic Mysteries
Christian eschatology
Noah's Ark
Ragnarök
Resurrection
Hades
Mortification of the flesh
Gladiator