Nucleosome

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Nucleosomes are the basic unit of DNA packaging in eukaryotes (cells with a nucleus), consisting of a segment of DNA wound around a histone protein core.[1] This structure is often compared to thread wrapped around a spool.[2]

Nucleosomes form the fundamental repeating units of eukaryotic chromatin[3], which is used to pack the large eukaryotic genomes into the nucleus while still ensuring appropriate access to it (in mammalian cells approximately 2 m of linear DNA have to be packed into a nucleus of roughly 10 ┬Ám diameter). Nucleosomes are folded through a series of successively higher order structures to eventually form a chromosome; this both compacts DNA and creates an added layer of regulatory control which ensures correct gene expression. Nucleosomes are thought to carry epigenetically inherited information in the form of covalent modifications of their core histones. The nucleosome hypothesis was proposed by Don and Ada Olins in 1974[4] and Roger Kornberg[5][6].

The nucleosome core particle consists of approximately 147[7] base pairs of DNA wrapped in 1.67 left-handed superhelical turns around a histone octamer consisting of 2 copies each of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4.[8] Core particles are connected by stretches of "linker DNA", which can be up to about 80 bp long. Technically, a nucleosome is defined as the core particle plus one of these linker regions; however the word is often synonymous with the core particle.[9]

Linker histones such as H1 and its isoforms are involved in chromatin compaction and sit at the base of the nucleosome near the DNA entry and exit binding to the linker region of the DNA.[10] Non-condensed nucleosomes without the linker histone resemble "beads on a string of DNA" under an electron microscope.[11]

In contrast to most eukaryotic cells, mature sperm cells largely use protamines to package their genomic DNA, most likely to achieve an even higher packaging ratio.[12] Histone equivalents and a simplified chromatin structure have also been found in Archea[13], proving that eukaryotes are not the only organisms that use nucleosomes.

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