Orange juice

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Orange juice is a popular beverage made from oranges. It is made by extraction from the fresh fruit, by desiccation and subsequent reconstitution of dried juice, or by concentration of the juice and the subsequent addition of water to the concentrate. The term "orange juice" is also used, both colloquially and commercially, to refer to "concentrated orange juice".

Contents

Health

Orange juice is a good source of vitamin C (ascorbic acid), potassium, thiamine, Phosphorus G, folic acid (Vitamin B9) and vitamin B6. The vitamin C in turn aids the body's absorption of iron. One 8-ounce (227 ml) glass of 100 percent orange juice counts as almost 25 percent of the USDA-recommended daily fruit and vegetable servings, based on a 2,000-calorie diet. Research shows orange juice is more nutrient dense than many commonly consumed 100 percent fruit juices, such as apple, grape, pineapple and prune.[1]

Citrus juices also contain flavonoids that are believed to have beneficial health effects. Orange juice containing pulp seems to be more nutritious than no-pulp varieties due to the flavonoids contained in the pulp.[2] If drunk on an empty stomach, orange juice can exacerbate present gastrointestinal conditions and/or cause mild and temporary stomach upset.

Due to the citric acid, orange juice typically has a pH of 3.5.[3] Drinking or sipping orange juice can therefore cause erosion of the tooth enamel, otherwise known as 'acid erosion'.

Commercial orange juice and concentrate

Frozen concentrated orange juice

When water is added to freshly-thawed concentrated orange juice, it is reconstituted.[4] Most of the orange juice sold today throughout the world is reconstituted juice.

Process

Freshly squeezed juice and filtered orange juice is pasteurized and is evaporated under vacuum and heat to remove most of the water before it is frozen. The concentrated juice, about 65% by weight sugar, is then stored at about +10°F (-12°C). At this point essences and oils, recovered during the vacuum concentration process, are added back to restore the flavor. To make cans of frozen concentrate for sale, filtered water is added back to bring the mass faction of sugar down to 42%, about three times the concentration of fresh juice.[citation needed]

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