Palladium

related topics
{acid, form, water}
{company, market, business}
{@card@, make, design}
{day, year, event}
{car, race, vehicle}
{god, call, give}
{math, energy, light}

Palladium (play /pəˈldiəm/ pə-LAY-dee-əm) is a chemical element with the chemical symbol Pd and an atomic number of 46. Palladium is a rare and lustrous silvery-white metal that was discovered in 1803 by William Hyde Wollaston, who named it after the asteroid Pallas, which was named after the epithet of the Greek goddess Athena, acquired by her when she slew Pallas.

Palladium, along with platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium and osmium form a group of elements referred to as the platinum group metals (PGMs). Platinum group metals share similar chemical properties, but palladium has the lowest melting point and is the least dense of these precious metals.

The unique properties of palladium and other platinum group metals account for their widespread use. One in four goods manufactured today either contain platinum group metals or the platinum group metals play a key role during their manufacturing process.[2] Over half of the supply of palladium and its congener platinum goes into catalytic converters, which convert up to 90% of harmful gases from auto exhaust (hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide) into less harmful substances (nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water vapor). Palladium is found in many electronics including computers, mobile phones, multi-layer ceramic capacitors, component plating, low voltage electrical contacts, and SED/OLED/LCD televisions. Palladium is also used in dentistry, medicine, hydrogen purification, chemical applications, and groundwater treatment. Palladium plays a key role in the technology used for fuel cells, which combines hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, heat and water.

Full article ▸

related documents
Catalysis
Solubility
Bohrium
Methanol
Carbon monoxide
Natural gas
Iridium
Amino acid
Alkene
Hafnium
Magnesium
Law of multiple proportions
Haloalkane
Cell wall
Fertilizer
Platinum
Germanium
DNA replication
Sodium hydroxide
Lithium
Nitric acid
Zinc
Noble gas
Phosphorus
Polonium
Potassium
Nickel
Fullerene
Hassium
Lead