Peanut butter and jelly sandwich

related topics
{food, make, wine}
{company, market, business}
{@card@, make, design}
{album, band, music}
{law, state, case}
{school, student, university}
{woman, child, man}
{rate, high, increase}

The peanut butter and jelly sandwich (PB&J or peanut butter and jam sandwich in Canada and the United Kingdom) is a sandwich, popular in North America, that includes a layer of peanut butter and either jam or jelly on bread, commonly between two slices, but sometimes eaten open-faced.

A variation uses two layers of peanut butter.[1]

A 2002 survey showed the average American will have eaten 1,500 of these sandwiches before graduating from high school.[2]

Contents

Variations

Some variants add[1] honey, chocolate or maple syrup, normal chocolate, the hazelnut-chocolate spread Nutella, marshmallows, raisins, bananas, butter, marshmallow fluff, potato chips (UK: crisps), cheese, other dried fruit, or another slice of bread. Other less common variations include slices of fresh fruit besides bananas such as apples or strawberries.

In 1968, The J.M. Smucker Co. introduced Goober, which combined alternating vertical stripes of peanut butter and jelly.

Sealed crustless sandwich

In December 1999, two independent inventors, Len Kretchman and David Geske, were granted U.S. patent,[3] "Sealed Crustless Sandwich" for a peanut butter sandwich that would have a long shelf life. The J.M. Smucker Co. bought the patent from the inventors and developed a commercial product based on the patent called Uncrustables. Smuckers then invested US$17 million in a new factory[4] to produce the product. By 2005, sales of Uncrustables had grown to $60 million a year with a 20% per year growth rate.

Smuckers attempted to enforce their patent rights by sending out cease and desist letters to competitors, and by expanding their intellectual property coverage via the patenting of a machine to produce Uncrustables sandwiches in high volume U.S. Patent 6,874,409 "Method and apparatus for making commercial crustless sandwiches and the crustless sandwich made thereby". The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, however, rejected the viability of the patent citing its similarity to existing processes such as that of fashioning ravioli or a pie crust.[5]

Full article ▸

related documents
Drink
Trifle
Caribbean cuisine
Chocolate chip cookie
Seasoning
Tostada
Frying
Neapolitan ice cream
Kvass
Lamington
Double steaming
Bovril
Baking
Gouda (cheese)
Raisin
Pie
Mortadella
Chocolate bar
Drupe
Cherry
Emmer
Osechi
Sambuca
Cannoli
Oolong
Hominy
Cuisine of Australia
Sour cherry
Braising
Junk food