Pershore Abbey

related topics
{church, century, christian}
{build, building, house}
{son, year, death}

Pershore Abbey, at Pershore in Worcestershire, was an Anglo-Saxon abbey and is now an Anglican parish church.

Contents

History

Foundation

The foundation of the minster at Pershore is alluded to in a spurious charter of King Æthelred of Mercia (r. 675-704). It purports to be the charter by which Æthelred granted 300 hides at Gloucester to Osric, king of the Hwicce, and another 300 at Pershore to Osric's brother Oswald.[1][2] It is preserved only as a copy in a 14th-century register of Gloucester, where it is followed by two charters listing the endowments made to the abbey until the reign of Burgred, king of Mercia (852-874).[3][4] The 300 hides mentioned here are unlikely to be a contemporary detail, as they were intended to represent the triple hundred which later made up the area of Worcestershire.[1] Historian H. P. R. Finberg suggests that the foundation charter may have been drafted in the 9th century, based on some authentic material.[5] Oswald's foundation of a monastery at Pershore is not stated explicitly in the charter, but the Worcester chronicle Cronica de Anglia, written c. 1150, reports it under the annal for 683, and John Leland, consulting the now lost Annals of Pershore, places the event around 689.[1][6] Patrick Sims-Williams suggests that the foundation by Oswald may also represent an oral tradition at Pershore, as its archives were probably destroyed in the fires of 1002 and again, 1223.[1]

Full article ▸

related documents
Passy Cemetery
William Butterfield
A.U.M.P. Church
Raphael of Brooklyn
Pope Innocent I
Gavoi
Elgin
Duomo
Sudbury Hall
Pope Anacletus
St. Hedwig's Cathedral
Sisto Badalocchio
Pope Alexander I
Glasnevin Cemetery
Pope Sabinian
Pietro Martire Vermigli
Hadleigh
Fonni
Ramsey Abbey
Adalbert (Archbishop of Magdeburg)
Mission San Fernando Rey de España
Francesco Zuccarelli
Procopius of Gaza
Galeazzo Alessi
Ringkøbing
Teilo
Alesso Baldovinetti
Ossip Zadkine
Aimoin
Pope Benedict I