Phaedriades

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{god, call, give}
{island, water, area}
{line, north, south}

In Greece, the Phaedriades (Φαιδριάδες, meaning "the shining ones"[citation needed]) were the pair of cliffs, ca 700 m high on the lower southern slope of Mt. Parnassos, which enclose the sacred site of Delphi, the center of the Hellenic world. Strabo, Plutarch and Pausanias all mentioned the Phaedriades in describing the site, a narrow valley of the Pleistus (today Xeropotamos) formed by Parnasse and Mt. Cirphis. Between them rises the Castalian Spring. Even today, at noontime, the rock faces reflect a dazzling glare.

References

  • Robert E. Bell. Place-names in classical mythology: Greece ABC-CLIO, 1989. pg. 106


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