Phenytoin

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{company, market, business}
{law, state, case}
{acid, form, water}
{work, book, publish}
{system, computer, user}
{line, north, south}

Phenytoin sodium is a commonly used antiepileptic. Phenytoin (fœnit'oin, IPA) acts to suppress the abnormal brain activity seen in seizure by reducing electrical conductance among brain cells by stabilizing the inactive state of voltage-gated sodium channels. Aside from seizures, it is an option in the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia in the event that carbamazepine or other 1st line treatment is deemed inappropriate.

It is sometimes considered a class 1b antiarrhythmic.[1]

Contents

Trade names

Phenytoin sodium has been marketed as Phenytek by Mylan Laboratories, previously Bertek Pharmaceuticals, and Dilantin; Australia also Dilantin Kapseals and Dilantin Infatabs in the USA, Eptoin by Abbott Group in India and as Epanutin in the UK and Israel, by Parke-Davis, now part of Pfizer. In the USSR and post-USSR countries, it was/is marketed as Дифенин (Diphenin, Dipheninum),.

History

Phenytoin (diphenylhydantoin) was first synthesized by German chemist Heinrich Biltz in 1908.[2] Biltz sold his discovery to Parke-Davis, which did not find an immediate use for it. In 1938, outside scientists including H. Houston Merritt and Tracy Putnam discovered phenytoin's usefulness for controlling seizures, without the sedative effects associated with phenobarbital.

Full article ▸

related documents
Sodium thiopental
Pancreas
Systemic lupus erythematosus
Scleroderma
Encephalitis
Tinnitus
Cataract
Psychosurgery
Prader-Willi syndrome
Niacin
Coronary circulation
Surgery
Group A streptococcal infection
Abscess
Hypothyroidism
Sleep disorder
Thymus
Dentistry
Jaundice
Theophylline
Insulin-like growth factor
Carbamazepine
Repetitive strain injury
Skin cancer
Stomach
Chagas disease
High-density lipoprotein
Paroxetine
Immunology
Prostate