Phylogenetics

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Adaptation
Genetic drift
Gene flow
Mutation
Natural selection
Speciation

Introduction
Evidence
Evolutionary history of life
History
Level of support
Modern synthesis
Objections / Controversy
Social effect
Theory and fact

Cladistics
Ecological genetics
Evolutionary anthropology
Evolutionary development
Evolutionary psychology
Molecular evolution
Phylogenetics
Population genetics
Systematics

In biology, phylogenetics is the study of evolutionary relatedness among various groups of organisms (for example, species or populations), which is discovered through molecular sequencing data and morphological data matrices. The term phylogenetics is of Greek origin from the terms phyle/phylon (φυλή/φῦλον), meaning "tribe, race", and genetikos (γενετικός), meaning "relative to birth" from genesis (γένεσις, "birth"). Taxonomy, the classification, identification, and naming of organisms, has been richly informed by phylogenetics but remains methodologically and logically distinct.[1]

The fields overlap however in the science of phylogenetic systematics – often called "cladism" or "cladistics" – where only phylogenetic trees are used to delimit taxa, which represent groups of lineage-connected individuals.[2] In biological systematics as a whole, phylogenetic analyses have become essential in researching the evolutionary tree of life.

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