Piezoelectricity

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{acid, form, water}
{system, computer, user}
{math, number, function}
{@card@, make, design}
{ship, engine, design}
{car, race, vehicle}
{company, market, business}
{work, book, publish}
{album, band, music}
{game, team, player}
{disease, patient, cell}
{mi², represent, 1st}

Piezoelectricity (pronounced /piˌeɪzoʊˌilɛkˈtrɪsɪti/) is the charge which accumulates in certain solid materials (notably crystals, certain ceramics, and biological matter such as bone, DNA and various proteins)[1] in response to applied mechanical strain. The word piezoelectricity means electricity resulting from pressure. It is derived from the Greek piezo or piezein (πιέζειν), which means to squeeze or press, and electric or electron (ήλεκτρον), which stands for amber – an ancient source of electric charge.[2] Piezoelectricity is the direct result of the piezoelectric effect.

The piezoelectric effect is understood as the linear electromechanical interaction between the mechanical and the electrical state in crystalline materials with no inversion symmetry.[3] The piezoelectric effect is a reversible process in that materials exhibiting the direct piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of electrical charge resulting from an applied mechanical force) also exhibit the reverse piezoelectric effect (the internal generation of a mechanical force resulting from an applied electrical field). For example, lead zirconate titanate crystals will generate measurable piezoelectricity when their static structure is deformed by about 0.1% of the original dimension. Conversely, lead zirconate titanate crystals will change about 0.1% of their static dimension when an external electric field is applied to the material.

Piezoelectricity is found in useful applications such as the production and detection of sound, generation of high voltages, electronic frequency generation, microbalances, and ultra fine focusing of optical assemblies. It is also the basis of a number of scientific instrumental techniques with atomic resolution, the scanning probe microscopies such as STM, AFM, MTA, SNOM, etc., and everyday uses such as acting as the ignition source for cigarette lighters and push-start propane barbecues.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Binding energy
Raman spectroscopy
Electrical resistance
Electron configuration
Auger electron spectroscopy
Ferromagnetism
Electrical impedance
Čerenkov radiation
Hall effect
Superfluid
Gaussian beam
Nucleon
Map projection
Star cluster
Electromagnetism
Population inversion
Geographic coordinate system
Velocity
Alcubierre drive
Focal length
Retrograde and direct motion
Comoving distance
Albedo
Vulcan (hypothetical planet)
Voyager 2
Red dwarf
Zodiac
Phobos (moon)
Big Bang nucleosynthesis
Boltzmann constant