Pisco

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Pisco (from Quechua: pisqu, little bird)[1] is a liquor distilled from grapes. Developed by Spanish settlers in the sixteenth century, as a cheaper alternative to imported Orujo from Spain, it takes its name from the conical pottery in which it was originally aged, which was also the name of one of the sites where it was produced: Pisco, in the Viceroyalty of Peru. The first vineyards were planted in the coastal valleys in the Viceroyalty. Even though Spain imposed many restrictions on wine production and commerce, the wine-making industry developed rapidly, such as in the corregimientos of Ica and La Serena. In modern times, it continues to be produced in winemaking regions of Peru. The right to produce and promote pisco has been the matter of legal disputes between Chile and Peru, despite the region of Pisco actually being in Peru, both countries hold their most iconic cocktail to be the pisco sour.

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