Polyvinylpyrrolidone

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Poly[1-(2-oxo-1-pyrrolidinyl)ethylen] 1-Ethenyl-2-pyrrolidon homopolymer 1-Vinyl-2-pyrrolidinon-Polymere Copovidone

110 - 180 °C (glass temperature)

Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), also called Polyvidone, is a water-soluble polymer made from the monomer N-vinylpyrrolidone:[1]

Contents

Properties

PVP is soluble in water and other polar solvents. When dry it is a light flaky powder, which readily absorbs up to 40% of its weight in atmospheric water. In solution, it has excellent wetting properties and readily forms films. This makes it good as a coating or an additive to coatings.

History

PVP was first synthesized by Prof. Walter Reppe and a patent was filed in 1939 for one of the most interesting derivatives of acetylene chemistry. PVP was initially used as a blood plasma substitute and later in a wide variety of applications in medicine, pharmacy, cosmetics and industrial production.[2]

Uses

The monomer is extremely toxic to aquatic life.

Medical

The polymer PVP was used as a blood plasma expander for trauma victims after the first half of the 20th century.

It is used as a binder in many pharmaceutical tablets;[3] it simply passes through the body when taken orally. However, autopsies have found that crospovidone does contribute to pulmonary vascular injury in substance abusers who have injected pharmaceutical tablets intended for oral consumption.[4] The long-term effects of crospovidone within the lung are unknown. PVP added to iodine forms a complex called povidone-iodine that possesses disinfectant properties.[5] This complex is used in various products like solutions, ointment, pessaries, liquid soaps and surgical scrubs. It is known for instance under the trade name Betadine.

It is used in pleurodesis (fusion of the pleura because of incessant pleural effusions). For this purpose, povidone iodine is equally effective and safe as talc, and may be preferred because of easy availability and low cost.[6]

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