Polyxena

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In Greek mythology, Polyxena (pronounced /pəˈlɪksɨnə/), Greek Πολυξένη, was the youngest daughter of King Priam of Troy and his queen, Hecuba.[1] She is considered the Trojan version of Iphigenia, daughter of Agamemnon and Clytemnestra. Polyxena is not in Homer's Iliad, appearing in works by later poets, perhaps to add romance to Homer's austere tale. An oracle prophesied that Troy would not be defeated if Polyxena's brother, Prince Troilus, reached the age of twenty. During the Trojan War, Polyxena and Troilus were ambushed when they were attempting to fetch water from a fountain, and Troilus was killed by the Greek warrior Achilles, who soon became interested in the quiet sagacity of Polyxena.

Achilles, still recovering from Patroclus' death, found Polyxena's words a comfort and was later told to go to the temple of Apollo to meet her after her devotions. Achilles seemed to genuinely trust Polyxena—he told her of his only vulnerability: his vulnerable heel. It was later in the temple of Apollo that Polyxena's brothers, Paris and Deiphobus, ambushed Achilles and shot him in the heel with an arrow, supposedly guided by the hand of Apollo himself, steeped in poison.

Some claimed Polyxena committed suicide after Achilles' death out of guilt. According to Euripides, however, in his plays The Trojan Women and Hecuba, Polyxena's famous death was caused at the end of the Trojan War. Achilles' ghost had come back to the Greeks, demanding that the wind needed to set sail back to Hellas was to be appeased by the human sacrifice of Polyxena. She was to be killed at the foot of Achilles' grave. Hecuba, Polyxena's mother, expressed despair at another of her daughter's death. Polyxena was killed after almost all of her brothers and sisters.

However, Polyxena is eager to die as a sacrifice to Achilles rather than die as a slave. She reassures her mother. She refuses to beg to Odysseus or be treated in any way other than a princess. She asks that Odysseus reassure her mother as she is led away. Polyxena's virginity was critical to the honor of her character, and she is described as dying bravely as the son of Achilles, Neoptolemus, slit her throat: she arranged her clothing around her carefully so that she was fully covered when she died.[1]

References

Sources

  • Servius. In Aeneida, iii.321.
  • Seneca. Troades, 1117-1161.
  • Ovid. Metamorphoses, xiii.441-480.

External links

 Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). "Polyxena". Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

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