Pope John XXII

related topics
{church, century, christian}
{son, year, death}
{government, party, election}
{theory, work, human}
{war, force, army}
{household, population, female}

Pope John XXII (1249 – December 4, 1334), born Jacques Duèze (or d'Euse), was pope from 1316 to 1334. He was the second Pope of the Avignon Papacy (1309–1377), elected by a conclave in Lyon assembled by Philip V of France. Like his predecessor, Clement V, he centralized power and income in the Papacy, living a princely life in Avignon and funding his court and wars.[1] He opposed Louis IV of Bavaria as emperor, and Louis in turn invaded Italy and set up an antipope, Nicholas V. Pope John XXII faced controversy in theology involving his views on the Beatific Vision, and he opposed the Franciscan understanding of the poverty of Christ and his apostles. He canonized St. Thomas Aquinas.

Contents

Biography

The son of a shoemaker in Cahors, Jacques Duèze studied medicine in Montpellier and law in Paris.

The death of Pope Clement V in 1314 was followed by a sedisvacancy of two years, due to disagreements between the cardinals, who were split into two factions. After two years, Philip V of France (1316–22) finally in 1316 managed to arrange a conclave of twenty-three cardinals in Lyon. This conclave elected Jacques Duèze, who took the name John XXII and was crowned in Lyon. He set up his residence in Avignon rather than Rome, continuing the Avignon Papacy of his predecessor.

John XXII involved himself in the politics and religious movements of many European countries in order to advance the interests of the Church. This made him a very controversial pope at the time. Also his close links with the French crown created widespread distrust of the papacy.[2]

Before John XXII's election a contest had begun for the imperial crown between Louis IV of Bavaria (1314–47) and his opponent, Frederick I of Austria (1308–30). John XXII was neutral at first; but in 1323, when Louis IV had won and became Holy Roman Emperor, the Guelph (papal) party and the Ghibelline (imperial) party began a serious quarrel. This was partly provoked by John XXII's extreme claims of authority over the empire and also partly by Louis IV's support of the spiritual Franciscans, whom John XXII condemned in the Papal bull Quorumdam exigit for their insistence on evangelical poverty and their belief that mendicant friars would replace the priesthood and sacraments of the Church.[3] Louis IV was assisted in his doctrinal dispute with the papacy by Marsilius of Padua, and later by the English Franciscan friar and scholar William of Ockham. Louis IV invaded Italy, entered Rome and set up Pietro Rainalducci as antipope Nicholas V (1328–30). The project was a fiasco. Guelphic predominance at Rome was later restored, and Pope John excommunicated William of Ockham. However, Louis IV had silenced the papal claims, and John XXII stayed the rest of his life in Avignon.

Full article ▸

related documents
Capua
Waltham Abbey (abbey)
Pope-elect Stephen
Oriental Orthodoxy
Synod of Dort
Pope Boniface IV
Vigevano
Pope Adrian I
Pope Honorius I
Exeter Cathedral
Roman villa
Nestorius
Conciergerie
Salisbury Cathedral
Eastern Orthodox Church organization
Pope Eleuterus
Dunfermline Abbey
Quirinal Hill
Pope Agatho
Donatist
Romsey Abbey
Athanasian Creed
First Council of Constantinople
Cimabue
Mark the Evangelist
Bertel Thorvaldsen
Alcobaça
Collège de Sorbonne
Ancona
Giorgio Vasari