Pope Pius V

related topics
{church, century, christian}
{war, force, army}
{government, party, election}
{son, year, death}
{law, state, case}
{day, year, event}
{work, book, publish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{game, team, player}

Pope Pius V (17 January 1504 – 1 May 1572), born Antonio Ghislieri (from 1518 called Michele Ghislieri, O.P.), was Pope from 1566 to 1572 and is a saint of the Catholic Church.[1] He is chiefly notable for his role in the Council of Trent, the Counter-Reformation, and the standardisation of the liturgy. Pius V declared Thomas Aquinas a Doctor of the Church and patronised prominent sacred music composer Giovanni Pierluigi da Palestrina.

As Cardinal Ghislieri he gained a reputation for putting orthodoxy before personalities, prosecuting eight French Bishops for heresy. He also stood firm against nepotism, rebuking his predecessor Pope Pius IV to his face when he wanted to make a 13-year old member of his family a cardinal and subsidise a nephew from the Papal treasury.

In affairs of state, Pius V excommunicated Elizabeth I of England for schism and persecutions of English Catholics during her reign. He also arranged the formation of the Holy League, an alliance of Catholic states, who, although outnumbered famously defeated the Ottomans at the Battle of Lepanto who had threatened to overrun Europe. This victory Pius V attributed to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary and instituted the feast, Our Lady of Victory.

Contents

Earlier Life

Antonio Ghislieri was born at Bosco in the Duchy of Milan (now Bosco Marengo in the province of Alessandria, Piedmont), Italy. At the age of fourteen he entered the Dominican Order, taking the name Michele, passing from the monastery of Voghera to that of Vigevano, and thence to Bologna. Ordained priest at Genoa in 1528, he was sent by his order to Pavia, where he lectured for sixteen years. At Parma he advanced thirty propositions in support of the papal chair and against the heresies of the time. As prior of more than one Dominican priory during a time of great moral laxity, he insisted on discipline, and, in accordance with his own wishes, he was appointed inquisitor at Como. As his reformist zeal provoked resentment, he was compelled to return to Rome in 1550, where, after having been employed in several inquisitorial missions, he was elected to the commissariat of the Holy Office. Pope Paul IV (1555–59), who, as Cardinal Carafa, had shown him special favor, conferred upon him the bishopric of Sutri and Nepi, the cardinalate with the title of Alessandrino, and the unique honor of the supreme inquisitorship. Under Pope Pius IV (1559–65) he became bishop of Mondovi in Piedmont, but his opposition to that pontiff procured his dismissal from the palace and the abridgment of his authority as inquisitor.

Full article ▸

related documents
Monte Cassino
Worcester Cathedral
Benevento
Second Council of Nicaea
Pope Felix I
Augustine of Canterbury
Arbroath Abbey
Presbyter
Polycarp
Pope Hilarius
Chichester Cathedral
Shrine of the Three Kings
Palace of Fontainebleau
Château de Blois
Ignatius of Antioch
Pope Marcellus I
Prince-Bishop
Albi
Sherborne Abbey
Hubert van Eyck
Gloucester Cathedral
Pachomius
Assisi
Matera
Architecture of ancient Greece
Reading Abbey
Wooden Churches of Maramureş
Order of Saint Benedict
Abbey of St. Gall
Dunstanburgh Castle