Port-du-Salut cheese

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Port-du-Salut or Entrammes is a mild variety of cheese manufactured from cow's milk first made by monks in the early 18th century and still produced in monasteries throughout France.

A version of the cheese is produced by a major creamery under the name Port-Salut, though there are minor differences between the commercially-prepared variety and handmade Port-du-Salut.

The origin of Port Salut is closely linked to the French Revolution of 1789. Fleeing from the persecutions, a congregation of Trappist Monks set themselves up abroad and, as a way of supporting themselves financially, learned how to make cheese. When they returned to France in 1815, they built a new abbey at Notre Dame, and continued to make their cheese.

Port Salut is a semi-soft natural cheese that is easily recognized by its orange rind. Unlike many other French cheeses, it is rather mild and sweet in flavor. The smooth and velvety texture has a light acidic taste giving freshness and a great finish.

Port Salut is smooth cheese made in Mayenne which belongs to the old Maine (province). Originally, it was named Port du Salut after the abbey of Notre Dame and made strictly for consumption at the monastery. A visit to Paris by the head of the abbey in 1873 resulted in an opportunistic distribution agreement with a Parisian cheese seller. A year later, sales of this disc shaped cheese were phenomenal and the monks registered Port du Salut as a trade name.

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