Poynting vector

related topics
{math, energy, light}
{math, number, function}
{system, computer, user}

In physics, the Poynting vector can be thought of as representing the energy flux (in W/m2) of an electromagnetic field. It is named after its inventor John Henry Poynting. Oliver Heaviside and Nikolay Umov independently co-invented the Poynting vector. In Poynting's original paper and in many textbooks it is defined as

which is often called the Abraham form; here E is the electric field and H the auxiliary magnetic field.[1][2] (All bold letters represent vectors.) Sometimes, an alternative definition in terms of electric field E and the magnetic field B is used, which is explained below. It is even possible to combine the displacement field D with the magnetic field B to get the Minkowski form of the Poynting vector, or use D and H to construct another.[3] The choice has been controversial: Pfeifer et al.[4] summarize the century-long dispute between proponents of the Abraham and Minkowski forms.

Contents

Interpretation

The Poynting vector appears in Poynting's theorem, an energy-conservation law,[2]

where Jf is the current density of free charges and u is the electromagnetic energy density,

where B is the magnetic field and D the electric displacement field.

Full article ▸

related documents
Quantum electrodynamics
Physical constant
Grand unification theory
Parsec
Meteoroid
Numerical aperture
Electromotive force
Voltage
Antenna gain
Sudbury Neutrino Observatory
Angle
Adiabatic process
Geostationary orbit
Seismic wave
Work function
Interference
Stress-energy tensor
Earth radius
Weakly interacting massive particles
Equatorial bulge
Spontaneous emission
Cosmological constant
Eta Carinae
61 Cygni
Zero-point energy
Fermion
Speckle pattern
Compton scattering
Ecliptic
Quantum gravity