Primate

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{law, state, case}
{disease, patient, cell}
{service, military, aircraft}
{island, water, area}
{group, member, jewish}
{area, part, region}
{@card@, make, design}

A primate (pronounced /ˈpraɪmeɪt/, US dict: prī′·māt) is a member of the biological order Primates (/praɪˈmeɪtiːz/ prī·mā′·tēz; Latin: "prime, first rank"[2]), the group that contains prosimians (including lemurs, lorises, galagos and tarsiers) and simians (monkeys and apes).[3] With the exception of humans, who inhabit every continent on Earth,[a] most primates live in tropical or subtropical regions of the Americas, Africa and Asia.[4] Primates range in size from the Madame Berthe's Mouse Lemur, which weighs only 30 grams (1.1 oz) to the Mountain Gorilla weighing 200 kilograms (440 lb). According to fossil evidence, the primitive ancestors of primates may have existed in the late Cretaceous period around 65 million years ago, and the oldest known primate is the Late Paleocene Plesiadapis, c. 55–58 million years ago.[5] Molecular clock studies suggest that the primate branch may be even older, originating in the mid-Cretaceous period around 85 mya.[5]

The Primates order has traditionally been divided into two main groupings: prosimians and simians. Prosimians have characteristics most like those of the earliest primates, and included the lemurs of Madagascar, lorisiforms and tarsiers. Simians included the monkeys and apes. More recently, taxonomists have created the suborder Strepsirrhini, or curly-nosed primates, to include non-tarsier prosimians and the suborder Haplorrhini, or dry-nosed primates, to include tarsiers and the simians. Simians are divided into two groups: the platyrrhines ("flat nosed") or New World monkeys of South and Central America and the catarrhine (narrow nosed) monkeys of Africa and southeastern Asia. The New World monkeys include the capuchin, howler and squirrel monkeys, and the catarrhines include the Old World monkeys (such as baboons and macaques) and the apes. Humans are the only catarrhines that have spread successfully outside of Africa, South Asia, and East Asia, although fossil evidence shows many species once existed in Europe as well.

Full article ▸

related documents
Cetacea
Procellariiformes
Alternation of generations
Ermine
Bear
Inflorescence
Ammonite
Chordate
Ostrich
European Robin
Indri
Cloudinid
Symbiosis
Tasmanian Devil
Squid
Felidae
Megatherium
Dingo
Bald Eagle
Azawakh
Albertosaurus
Odd-toed ungulate
Arabidopsis thaliana
Tuber
Amphibian
Seashell
Coelacanth
Antelope
Sea urchin
Chihuahua (dog)