Project MKULTRA

related topics
{law, state, case}
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{work, book, publish}
{service, military, aircraft}
{war, force, army}
{film, series, show}
{school, student, university}
{son, year, death}
{government, party, election}
{woman, child, man}
{company, market, business}
{black, white, people}
{day, year, event}
{game, team, player}

Project MKULTRA, or MK-ULTRA, was the code name for a covert, illegal CIA human research program, run by the Office of Scientific Intelligence. This official U.S. government program began in the early 1950s, continuing at least through the late 1960s, and it used U.S. and Canadian citizens as its test subjects.[1][2][3][4]

The published evidence indicates that Project MKULTRA involved the use of many methodologies to manipulate individual mental states and alter brain functions, including the surreptitious administration of drugs and other chemicals, sensory deprivation, isolation, and verbal and sexual abuse.

Project MKULTRA was first brought to wide public attention in 1975 by the U.S. Congress, through investigations by the Church Committee, and by a presidential commission known as the Rockefeller Commission. Investigative efforts were hampered by the fact that CIA Director Richard Helms ordered all MKULTRA files destroyed in 1973; the Church Committee and Rockefeller Commission investigations relied on the sworn testimony of direct participants and on the relatively small number of documents that survived Helms' destruction order.[5]

In 1977, a FOIA request uncovered a cache of 20,000 documents[6] relating to project MKULTRA, which led to the Senate Hearings of 1977.[2] In recent times most information regarding MKULTRA has been officially declassified.

Although the CIA insists that MKULTRA-type experiments have been abandoned, 14-year CIA veteran Victor Marchetti has stated in various interviews that the CIA routinely conducts disinformation campaigns and that CIA mind control research continued. In a 1977 interview, Marchetti specifically called the CIA claim that MKULTRA was abandoned a "cover story."[7][8]

On the Senate floor in 1977, Senator Ted Kennedy said:

The Deputy Director of the CIA revealed that over thirty universities and institutions were involved in an "extensive testing and experimentation" program which included covert drug tests on unwitting citizens "at all social levels, high and low, native Americans and foreign." Several of these tests involved the administration of LSD to "unwitting subjects in social situations." At least one death, that of Dr. Olson, resulted from these activities. The Agency itself acknowledged that these tests made little scientific sense. The agents doing the monitoring were not qualified scientific observers.[9]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
United States constitutional law
Informed consent
Wikipedia:Administrators
Assault
Universal jurisdiction
United States district court
Article Five of the United States Constitution
Sovereign immunity
Rule of law
Court-martial
Trust law
Whistleblower
Standing (law)
Coroner
Contempt of court
Judicial functions of the House of Lords
Private investigator
Supreme Court of Canada
M'Naghten Rules
Article Four of the United States Constitution
Eldred v. Ashcroft
Theft
Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution
Frivolous litigation
Corporate personhood debate
Treaty of Waitangi
Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution
Nuremberg Trials
Clarence Thomas
James Randi Educational Foundation