Prostaglandin

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{acid, form, water}
{group, member, jewish}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

A prostaglandin is any member of a group of lipid compounds that are derived enzymatically from fatty acids and have important functions in the animal body. Every prostaglandin contains 20 carbon atoms, including a 5-carbon ring.

They are mediators and have a variety of strong physiological effects, such as regulating the contraction and relaxation of smooth muscle tissue.[1] Prostaglandins are not hormones, but autocrine or paracrine, which are locally acting messenger molecules. They differ from hormones in that they are not produced at a discrete site but in many places throughout the human body. Also, their target cells are present in the immediate vicinity of the site of their excretion (of which there are many).

The prostaglandins, together with the thromboxanes and prostacyclins, form the prostanoid class of fatty acid derivatives, a subclass of eicosanoids.

Contents

History and name

The name prostaglandin derives from the prostate gland. When prostaglandin was first isolated from seminal fluid in 1935 by the Swedish physiologist Ulf von Euler,[2] and independently by M.W. Goldblatt,[3] it was believed to be part of the prostatic secretions. (In fact, prostaglandins are produced by the seminal vesicles). It was later shown that many other tissues secrete prostaglandins for various functions. The first total syntheses of prostaglandin F and prostaglandin E2 were reported by E. J. Corey in 1969.[4]

Full article ▸

related documents
Glutamine
Capillary
Amoxicillin
Retrovirus
Monoamine oxidase
Melanocyte
Fibroblast
Peritonitis
Darbepoetin alfa
Lemierre's syndrome
Shigellosis
Febrile seizure
Duodenum
Bacterial vaginosis
Placenta
Disease
Stevens-Johnson syndrome
John Cade
Bioterrorism
Cyclothymia
Anosmia
Lymphoma
Sports injury
Peyronie's disease
Infection
Heart disease
Joubert syndrome
Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome
Rift Valley fever
Canavan disease