Provinces of France

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The Kingdom of France was organised into provinces until March 4, 1790, when the establishment of the département system superseded provinces. The change was an attempt to eradicate local loyalties based on feudal ownership of land and focus all loyalty on the central government in Paris.

The process by which the territory of the various provinces was gradually incorporated into France may be followed in the article Territorial formation of France.

The names of the former provinces are still used by geographers to designate natural regions, and several French administrative regions carry their names.

Contents

List of former provinces of France

Provinces

1. Île-de-France (Paris)
2. Berry (Bourges)
3. Orléanais (Orléans)
4. Normandy (Rouen)
5. Languedoc (Toulouse)
6. Lyonnais (Lyon)
7. Dauphiné (Grenoble)
8. Champagne (Troyes)
9. Aunis (La Rochelle)
10. Saintonge (Saintes)
11. Poitou (Poitiers)
12. Guyenne and Gascony (Bordeaux)
13. Burgundy (Dijon)
14. Picardy (Amiens)
15. Anjou (Angers)
16. Provence (Aix-en-Provence)
17. Angoumois (Angoulême)
18. Bourbonnais (Moulins)
19. Marche (Guéret)
20. Brittany (Rennes)

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