Pseudoscience

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{law, state, case}
{disease, patient, cell}
{rate, high, increase}
{work, book, publish}
{math, number, function}
{@card@, make, design}
{math, energy, light}

Pseudoscience is a claim, belief, or practice which is presented as scientific, but which does not adhere to a valid scientific methodology, lacks supporting evidence or plausibility, cannot be reliably tested, or otherwise lacks scientific status.[1] Pseudoscience is often characterized by the use of vague, exaggerated or unprovable claims, an over-reliance on confirmation rather than rigorous attempts at refutation, a lack of openness to evaluation by other experts, and a general absence of systematic processes to rationally develop theories. The term "pseudoscience" is inherently pejorative, because it suggests that something is being inaccurately or deceptively portrayed as science.[2] Accordingly, those labeled as practicing or advocating pseudoscience normally dispute the characterization.[2]

Distinguishing scientific facts and theories from pseudoscientific beliefs such as astrology, medical quackery, occult beliefs, and other superstitions is part of science education and scientific literacy.[3][4] There is, however, some disagreement among philosophers of science and members of the scientific community as to whether there is a consistent and meaningful way to distinguish pseudoscience from merely non-mainstream science.[citation needed]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding
Evaluation
Peter Singer
Cosmological argument
Baruch Spinoza
Interdisciplinarity
Rudolf Steiner
Problem of universals
Carl Rogers
Clairvoyance
Historicism
Concept
Kitsch
Anthroposophy
Sociology of knowledge
Noumenon
Jean-Paul Sartre
Jean Piaget
Philosophy of education
John Searle
George Lakoff
Myers-Briggs Type Indicator
Omnipotence paradox
Post-structuralism
Utilitarianism
Dualism
Wikipedia:Words to avoid
Homo economicus
Reductionism
Louis Althusser