Punched card

related topics
{system, computer, user}
{@card@, make, design}
{law, state, case}
{work, book, publish}
{company, market, business}
{math, number, function}
{game, team, player}
{land, century, early}
{area, community, home}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}

A punched card (also known by various synonyms) is a piece of stiff paper that contains digital information represented by the presence or absence of holes in predefined positions. Now almost an obsolete recording medium, punched cards were widely used throughout the 19th century for controlling textile looms and in the late 19th and early 20th century for operating fairground organs and related instruments. They were used through the 20th century in unit record machines for input, processing, and data storage. Early digital computers used punched cards, often prepared using keypunch machines, as the primary medium for input of both computer programs and data. Some voting machines use punched cards.

Contents

History

Punched cards were first used around 1725 by Basile Bouchon and Jean-Baptiste Falcon as a more robust form of the perforated paper rolls then in use for controlling textile looms in France. This technique was greatly improved by Joseph Marie Jacquard in his Jacquard loom in 1801.

Full article ▸

related documents
Tape recorder
IMac
Analog television
Disk storage
Virtual Boy
LocalTalk
Dragon 32/64
Direct distance dialing
Timeline of computing 1990–present
QuarkXPress
Pentium
Free Lossless Audio Codec
Digital
Poqet PC
Meiko Scientific
Minicomputer
Circuit switching
Provisioning
Static random access memory
OpenVMS
Non-Uniform Memory Access
Transport Layer
Routing Information Protocol
Twisted pair
8VSB
Apache HTTP Server
Ping
K-Meleon
Mac OS X Server
ColecoVision