Punk fashion

related topics
{@card@, make, design}
{album, band, music}
{woman, child, man}
{black, white, people}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{game, team, player}
{film, series, show}

Punk fashion is the clothing, hairstyles, cosmetics, jewelry, and body modifications of the punk subculture. Punk fashion varies widely, ranging from Vivienne Westwood designs to styles modeled on bands like The Exploited. The distinct social dress of other subcultures and art movements, including glam rock, skinheads, rude boys, greasers, and mods have influenced punk fashion. Punk fashion has likewise influenced the styles of these groups, as well as those of popular culture. Many punks use clothing as a way of making a statement.

Punk fashion has been extremely commercialized at various times, and many well-established fashion designers — such as Vivienne Westwood and Jean Paul Gaultier — have used punk elements in their production. Punk clothing, which was initially handmade, became mass produced and sold in record stores and some smaller specialty clothing stores by the 1980s. Many fashion magazines and other glamor-oriented media have featured classic punk hairstyles and punk-influenced clothing. These have caused controversy, as many punks view it as having sold out.

Contents

History

Punk rock was an intentional rebuttal of the perceived excess and pretension found in mainstream music (or even mainstream culture as a whole), and early punk artists' fashion was defiantly anti-materialistic. Generally unkempt, often short hairstyles replaced the long-hair hippie look and the usually elaborate 1970s rock/disco styles. In the United States, dirty, simple clothes - ranging from the T-shirt/jeans/leather jacket Ramones look to the low-class, second-hand "dress" clothes of acts like Television or Patti Smith - were preferred over the expensive or colorful clothing popular in the disco scene.

Full article ▸

related documents
Tatting
Textile
Stencil duplicator
Fishing reel
Wire
Linen
View camera
Floor
Horseshoe
Wakeboarding
Spinning (textiles)
Mace (club)
Lithography
Seal (device)
Screen-printing
Loom
Paper clip
Wood router
Parchment
Denim
Leather
Kinder Surprise
Knot
Printing
Invisible ink
Body piercing
Lumber
Geodesic dome
Pencil
Thatching