Quadruped

related topics
{specie, animal, plant}
{disease, patient, cell}
{theory, work, human}
{law, state, case}
{group, member, jewish}
{water, park, boat}

Quadrupedalism is a form of land animal locomotion using four limbs or legs. An animal or machine that usually moves in a quadrupedal manner is known as a quadruped, meaning "four feet" (from the Latin quad for "four" and ped for "foot"). The majority of walking animals are vertebrate animals, including mammals such as cattle, dogs and cats, and reptiles, like lizards.

Birds, humans, insects, crustaceans, and snakes are not quadrupeds. However, there are some exceptions. For example, among the insects, the praying mantis is a quadruped. A few birds may use quadrupedal movement in some circumstances, for example the shoebill will sometimes use its wings to right itself after lunging at prey.[1]

Contents

Quadrupeds vs. tetrapods

Not all four-limbed animals are quadrupeds. Although arms and wings are, in the evolutionary sense, modified legs, four-limbed vertebrates are in fact classed as tetrapods, members of the taxonomic unit Tetrapoda. These include all vertebrates with quadrupedal ancestors, including mammals, reptiles, amphibians, and birds.

The distinction between quadrupeds and tetrapods is important in evolutionary biology, particularly in the context of bipeds, winged animals, and animals whose limbs have adapted to other roles (e.g. fins, in the case of cetaceans and pinnipeds). All of these animals are tetrapods, but none are quadrupeds. Even snakes, whose limbs have become vestigial or lost entirely, are nevertheless tetrapods.

Quadrupedalism in humans

In July 2005, in rural Turkey, scientists discovered five Kurdish siblings who had learned to walk naturally on their hands and feet. Unlike chimpanzees, who ambulate on their knuckles, the Turkish siblings (ranging from 18 to 34 years old) walked on their palms, allowing them to preserve the dexterity of their fingers. Calluses found on their hands make the possibility of a hoax unlikely. Another similar case has been reported in Chile, but the case is still being investigated and reports are not released as of March 22, 2006.

Full article ▸

related documents
Nightjar
Charadriiformes
Galago
Chelicerata
Daphnia
Testudines
Bilateria
Porcupine
Priapulida
Wren
Sugar Glider
Cheirogaleidae
Bos
Honey Possum
Larch
Vertebrate
Bulbul
Odonata
Tilapia
Sexual reproduction
Russian Blue
Himalayan (cat)
Archaeocyatha
Fly
Ardipithecus
Harrier (dog)
Sea lion
Texas longhorn (cattle)
Rafflesia
Ecological niche