Quinolone

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The quinolones are a family of synthetic broad-spectrum antibiotics. The term quinolone(s) refers to potent synthetic chemotherapeutic antibacterials,.[1][2]

The first generation of the quinolones begins with the introduction of nalidixic acid in 1962 for treatment of urinary tract infections in humans.[3] Nalidixic acid was discovered by George Lesher and coworkers in a distillate during an attempt at chloroquine synthesis.[4]

They prevent bacterial DNA from unwinding and duplicating.[5] (See Mechanism of Action later.)

Quinolones in comparison to other antibiotic classes have the highest risk of causing colonization with MRSA and Clostridium difficile. A general avoidance of fluoroquinolones is recommended based on the available evidence and clinical guidelines.[6][7][8] The majority of quinolones in clinical use belong to the subset of fluoroquinolones, which have a fluorine atom attached to the central ring system, typically at the 6-position or C-7 position.

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