RSS

related topics
{work, book, publish}
{system, computer, user}
{math, number, function}
{company, market, business}
{style, bgcolor, rowspan}
{ship, engine, design}
{film, series, show}
{group, member, jewish}
{language, word, form}

RSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format.[2] An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed",[3] or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader", or "aggregator", which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. A standardized XML file format allows the information to be published once and viewed by many different programs. The user subscribes to a feed by entering into the reader the feed's URI or by clicking an RSS icon in a web browser that initiates the subscription process. The RSS reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new work, downloads any updates that it finds, and provides a user interface to monitor and read the feeds. RSS allows users to avoid manually inspecting all of the websites they are interested in, and instead subscribe to websites such that all new content is pushed onto their browsers when it becomes available.

RSS formats are specified using XML, a generic specification for the creation of data formats. Although RSS formats have evolved from as early as March 1999,[4] it was between 2005 and 2006 when RSS gained widespread use, and the ("Feed-icon.svg") icon was decided upon by several major Web browsers.[5]

Contents

History

The RSS formats were preceded by several attempts at web syndication that did not achieve widespread popularity. The basic idea of restructuring information about websites goes back to as early as 1995, when Ramanathan V. Guha and others in Apple Computer's Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework.[6] For a more detailed discussion of these early developments, see the history of web syndication technology.

Full article ▸

related documents
Hypertext
Wikipedia:Signatures
Claude Shannon
Electronic mailing list
Dave Winer
John Vincent Atanasoff
People in systems and control
CNN
Wikipedia:FAQ/Overview
Philo Farnsworth
Project Xanadu
Jef Raskin
Subversion (software)
Wikipedia:FAQ/Miscellaneous
Wikipedia:Wikipedians/Photographers
Talker
The Inquirer
Rsync
Object Linking and Embedding
Markup language
List of ad-hoc routing protocols
Graphics Device Interface
Video clip
Digital art
The Irish Times
Quattro Pro
Web directory
Node-to-node data transfer
Tagged Image File Format
XUL