Reelin

related topics
{disease, patient, cell}
{acid, form, water}
{specie, animal, plant}
{theory, work, human}
{area, part, region}
{math, number, function}
{@card@, make, design}
{language, word, form}
{woman, child, man}
{game, team, player}
{work, book, publish}

Reelin is a protein that helps regulate processes of neuronal migration and positioning in the developing brain. Besides this important role in early development, reelin continues to work in the adult brain. It modulates the synaptic plasticity by enhancing the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation.[1][2] It also stimulates dendrite[3] and dendritic spine[4] development and regulates the continuing migration of neuroblasts generated in adult neurogenesis sites like subventricular and subgranular zones. It is found not only in the brain, but also in the spinal cord, blood, and other body organs and tissues.

Reelin has been suggested to be implicated in pathogenesis of several brain diseases. The expression of the protein has been found to be significantly lower in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder, but the cause of this remains uncertain as studies show that psychotropic medication itself affects RELN expression and the epigenetic hypothesis aimed at explaining the changed levels[5] has received some contradictory evidence.[6][7] Total lack of reelin causes a form of lissencephaly. Reelin may also play a role in Alzheimer's disease, temporal lobe epilepsy and autism.

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Hormone
Combined oral contraceptive pill
Sudden infant death syndrome
Inclusion body myositis
Inflammation
Rheumatoid arthritis
Lysergic acid diethylamide
Insulin
Omega-3 fatty acid
Sleep
Testosterone
Vitamin D
Tocopherol
Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder
Epilepsy
Menopause
Multiple sclerosis
Ketamine
Drug addiction
Homeopathy
Atherosclerosis
Cerebellum
Mental disorder
Electroconvulsive therapy
Methadone
Obsessive-compulsive disorder
Infectious disease
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Acne vulgaris
Glossary of medical terms related to communications disorders