San Saba County, Texas

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San Saba County is a county located on the Edwards Plateau in Western Central Texas. In 2000, its population was 6,186. Its county seat is San Saba[1]. It is named for the San Saba River, which flows through the county.

United Confederate Veterans organized a chapter known as the "William P. Rogers Camp" in San Saba County after the death in 1889 of Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Rogers, a hero of the Battle of Corinth in Mississippi, was a native of Georgia. He did not live in San Saba, but his daughter, Fannie, married one of Rogers' officers, George Harris, who moved there in 1880. A former county judge, Harris served as a commander of Rogers Camp, named for his father-in-law. The veterans' organization lasted until the early 1930s.[2]

During the 1880s, a vigilante mob, organized like a fraternal lodge, killed a number of San Saba County settlers. In 1896, the Texas Rangers began an investigation. Uluth M. Sanderson, editor of the San Saba County News, ran editorials against the mob. Ultimately, the mob was broken by the Ranger Captain Bill McDonald and District Attorney W.C. Linder. Few of the outlaws ever paid for their crimes.[citation needed]

Abraham Lincoln Galloway (March 3, 1901—August 17, 1961) was a rancher in San Saba County. An historical marker at the courthouse in San Saba describes him as: "One of the greatest San Saba cowboys ever to grace the back of a horse. He enjoyed deep and lasting friendships with many. Abe was truly a good man with a heart as big as the cowboy's loop he was known for throwing. His integrity and his word were accepted by all who knew him, a handshake was his bond." Galloway, a son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Galloway, is interred at Hillcrest Cemetery.[citation needed]

Another San Saba County historical marker honors the Texas state District Judge Jack B. Miller (October 21, 1921—February 15, 1991).[citation needed]

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