Sardinian language

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Sardinian (Sardu, Limba Sarda) is the collective name of the vernacular linguistic varieties spoken in most of the island of Sardinia, Italy. It is considered the most conservative of the Romance languages in terms of phonology and is noted for its Paleosardinian substratum.

Contents

Linguistics

Dialects

The Sardinian language can be divided into the following main subregional language groups clearly identified by isogloss bundles:

  • Sardinian proper, characterised by a plural in -s and definite articles derived from the Latin IPSUM
    • Northern, the most conservative dialect
      • sas limbas — 'the languages'
      • sas abbas — 'the waters'
    • Central, considered to be a transitional dialect between Northern and Southern Sardinian
      • is limbas — 'the languages'
      • is abbas — 'the waters'
    • Southern, more influenced by Spanish and continental Italian:
      • is linguas — 'the languages'
      • is acuas — 'the waters'
  • Corso-Sardinian dialects, spoken in the extreme north of Sardinia, are sometimes considered as independent languages or to be part of the Corsican language rather than Sardinian. They are characterised by a plural in -i and definite articles derived from the Latin ILLUM
    • Sassarese (G-shape)
      • eba — 'water'
      • garri — 'meat'
      • eu digu — 'I say'
    • Gallurese (C-shape)
      • e'a — 'water'
      • carri — 'meat'
      • eu dicu — 'I say'

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