Saxons

related topics
{language, word, form}
{war, force, army}
{church, century, christian}
{god, call, give}
{land, century, early}
{country, population, people}
{area, part, region}
{son, year, death}
{day, year, event}
{build, building, house}
{rate, high, increase}
{island, water, area}
{law, state, case}
{food, make, wine}
{black, white, people}
{math, energy, light}
{county, mile, population}

The Saxons (Latin: Saxones, Old English: Seaxe, Old Saxon: Sahson) were a confederation of Old Germanic tribes. Their modern-day descendants are generally considered ethnic Germans, Dutch, or English. They are primarily found in Lower Saxony, Schleswig-Holstein, Saxony-Anhalt, Westphalia, Drenthe, Overijssel, and England. The modern German state of Saxony is not inhabited by Saxon descendants, and was so-named because it came to be ruled by the medieval Saxon dynasty.

The Saxons earliest known area of settlement is Northern Albingia, an area approximately that of modern Holstein. This area overlapped the area of the Angles, a tribe with which they were frequently closely linked.

Saxons participated in the Germanic settlement of Britain during and after the 5th century. It is unknown how many migrated from the continent to Britain though estimates for the total number of Germanic settlers vary between 10,000 and 200,000.[1] Since the 18th century, many continental Saxons have settled other parts of the world, especially in North America, Australia, South Africa, South of Brazil and in areas of the former Soviet Union, where some communities still maintain parts of their cultural and linguistic heritage, often under the umbrella categories "German", and "Dutch".

Because of international Hanseatic trading routes and contingent migration during the Middle Ages, Saxons mixed with and had strong influences upon the languages and cultures of the Scandinavian and Baltic peoples, and also upon the Polabian Slavs and Pomeranian West Slavic peoples.

The pre-Christian settlement of the Saxon people originally covered an area a little more to the northwest, with parts of the southern Jutland Peninsula, Old Saxony and small sections of the eastern Low Countries (Belgium and the Netherlands). During the 5th century AD, the Saxons were part of the people invading the Romano-British province of Britannia. One of the other tribes was the Germanic Angles, whose name, taken together with that of the Saxons led to the formation of the modern term, Anglo-Saxons.

Full article ▸

related documents
Sarmatians
Gaul
Bulgars
Dacia
Dál Riata
Æthelberht of Kent
Urartu
Wends
Sorbs
Pomaks
Amen
Picts
Vandals
Alans
Mercia
Voivode
Ulster
Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period
Turan
Mongolian writing systems
Cree language
Wade-Giles
Tāna
Yankee
Ruthenia
Today's New International Version
W
Bislama
Cedilla
Northern dynasties