Science

related topics
{theory, work, human}
{work, book, publish}
{math, energy, light}
{language, word, form}

Science (from the Latin scientia, meaning "knowledge") is an enterprise that builds and organizes knowledge in the form of testable explanations and predictions about the natural world.[1][2][3][4] An older meaning still in use today is that of Aristotle, for whom scientific knowledge was a body of reliable knowledge that can be logically and rationally explained (see "History and etymology" section below).[5]

Since classical antiquity science as a type of knowledge was closely linked to philosophy, the way of life dedicated to discovering such knowledge. And into early modern times the two words, "science" and "philosophy", were sometimes used interchangeably in the English language. By the 17th century, "natural philosophy" (which is today called "natural science") could be considered separately from "philosophy" in general.[6] But "science" continued to also be used in a broad sense denoting reliable knowledge about a topic, in the same way it is still used in modern terms such as library science or political science. .

The more narrow sense of "science" that is common today developed as a part of science became a distinct enterprise of defining "laws of nature", based on early examples such as Kepler's laws, Galileo's laws, and Newton's laws of motion. In this period it became more common to refer to natural philosophy as "natural science". Over the course of the 19th century, the word "science" became increasingly associated with the disciplined study of the natural world including physics, chemistry, geology and biology. This sometimes left the study of human thought and society in a linguistic limbo, which was resolved by classifying these areas of academic study as social science. Similarly, several other major areas of disciplined study and knowledge exist today under the general rubric of "science", such as formal science and applied science.[7]

Contents

Full article ▸

related documents
Functionalism (sociology)
Gilles Deleuze
John Dewey
Mind
Unification Thought
Falsifiability
History of logic
Noam Chomsky
Consequentialism
Emotion
Reasoning
Conspiracy theory
Causality
Religion
Self-esteem
Reality
Dialectical materialism
Fundamentalism
Theory
Maurice Merleau-Ponty
Unconscious mind
Edmund Husserl
Structuralism
Gottfried Leibniz
Transactional analysis
Surrealism
Theodor W. Adorno
Social class
Critical theory
Paul Feyerabend