Scientific Revolution

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In the history of science, the Scientific Revolution was a period when new ideas in physics, astronomy, biology, human anatomy, chemistry, and other sciences led to a rejection of doctrines that had prevailed starting in Ancient Greece and continuing through the Middle Ages, and laid the foundation of modern science.[1] According to a majority of scholars, the scientific revolution began with the publication of two works that changed the course of science in 1543 and continued through the late 18th century: Nicolaus Copernicus's De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) and Andreas Vesalius's De humani corporis fabrica (On the Fabric of the Human body).

Philosopher and historian Alexandre Koyré coined the term scientific revolution in 1939 to describe this epoch.[2]

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Significance of the revolution

The science of the late renaissance was significant in establishing a base for modern science. The Marxist[3] historian and scientist J. D. Bernal stated that "the renaissance enabled a scientific revolution which let scholars look at the world in a different light. Religion, superstition, and fear were replaced by reason and knowledge".[citation needed] Despite some challenges to religious dogma, however, many notable figures of the scientific revolution—Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho Brahe, Newton, and even Galileo—remained devout in their faith.

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