Scripting language

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A scripting language, script language or extension language is a programming language that allows control of one or more software applications. "Scripts" are distinct from the core code of the application, as they are usually written in a different language and are often created or at least modified by the end-user.[1] Scripts are often interpreted from source code or bytecode, whereas application software is typically first compiled to a native machine code or to an intermediate code.[2]

The name "script" is derived from the written script of the performing arts, in which dialogue is set down to be spoken by human actors.[citation needed] Early script languages were often called batch languages or job control languages. Such early scripting languages were created to shorten the traditional edit-compile-link-run process.

Contents

History

Early mainframe computers (in the 1950s) were non-interactive instead using batch processing. IBM's Job Control Language (JCL) is the archetype of language used to control batch processing.

The first interactive shells were developed in the 1960s to enable remote operation of the first time-sharing systems, and these used shell scripts, which controlled running computer programs within a computer program, the shell.

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