Sichuan pepper

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Sichuan pepper (or Szechuan pepper) is the outer pod of the tiny fruit of a number of species in the genus Zanthoxylum (most commonly Z. piperitum, Z. simulans, and Z. schinifolium), widely grown and consumed in Asia as a spice. Despite the name, it is not related to black pepper or to chili peppers. It is widely used in the cuisine of Sichuan, China, from which it takes its name, as well as Tibetan, Bhutanese, Nepalese, Japanese, Konkani, and Batak Toba cuisines, among others.

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Names

Sichuan pepper is known in Chinese as huājiāo (花椒; literally "flower pepper"). A lesser-used name is shānjiāo (; literally "mountain pepper"; not to be confused with Tasmanian mountain pepper), which is also the root of the Japanese sanshō (山椒?). Confusingly, the Korean sancho (산초, 山椒) refers to a different if related species (Z. schinifolium), while Z. piperitum is known as chopi (초피).[2]

The Indian subcontinent uses a number of varieties of Sichuan pepper. In Konkani it is known as tephal or tirphal.[3] In Nepali, Z. alatum is known as timur (टिमुर), while in Tibetan, it is known as yer ma (གཡེར་མ)[2] and in Bhutan as thingay.[citation needed]

In Indonesia's North Sumatra province, around Lake Toba, Z. acanthopodium is known as andaliman in the Batak Toba language[2] and tuba in the Batak Karo language.[citation needed]

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